• Maggie Meahl

The Huntington family of Norwich, Connecticut

Updated: Apr 13


The last couple of years my research and writing focused on Faith Trumbull Huntington (1742-1775), the extremely well-educated daughter of the wartime governor of Connecticut Jonathan Trumbull and wife of Colonel Jedediah Huntington. It culminated in an article in The Connecticut History Review published entitled "Faith Trumbull Huntington: An Eighteenth-Century Woman Encounters War," in its Spring 2019 issue (which can be accessed digitally through their website https://www.press.uillinois.edu/journals/chr.html.) I am very proud of that accomplishment (even though the article sorely needed a final copyedit--something I should have paid for). It certainly was an imperfect process full of frustrations, a-ha moments, help from kind developmental editors, and finally a validation that I am a scholar and my writing is worthy. My goal to get published in a scholarly journal was met.


This year I have a new goal, that is, to publish (not sure how yet) a family history (and companion blog) describing one line of the ambitious Huntington family that dominated Norwich, Connecticut-life from its founding by Puritan immigrants, in 1659, until the departure, in 1892, by my great-grandfather's family for a better life in Washington, D.C. They are only one of hundreds of family lines, of the huge Huntington clan. What makes them interesting to me is that they basically stayed in the same town for 233 years. My aim is to find out WHY they stayed and to focus on the women's side of the story, always undertold in history books.


So, I have a lot to do and, of course, am easily distracted. But I think their story will provide more entertainment, drama, and secrets than any novel.

The Joseph Lawson Weatherly Huntington family of Norwichtown, CT. Picture probably taken in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. circa 1915. My grandmother, Margaret Isabelle Huntington is seated on her grandmother's (Isabelle Eunice Fitch Huntington 1845-1922?)







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